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This Month's Health Tip



SPRING into health!
          
With flowers blooming and birds chirping, spring can be invigorating. Take advantage of the warmer weather to help improve your health.

Take a walk. Walking 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week can decrease your blood pressure, help you lose weight, and give you more energy.

Play ball! Spring means the start of baseball season so get outside and play catch with your children.  Moderate physical activity like playing with your children just a few days a week can improve your health by burning calories and decreasing stress. 

Eat like a hummingbird.  Eating several small meals a day instead of 2 or 3 large meals may help you consume fewer calories and maintain more energy throughout the day.  Snack on healthy items such as raw fruits and vegetables or nuts in between larger meals rather than candy or junk food.   

Get outside! Spring means nicer, warmer weather and fewer excuses to stay inside on the couch.  So turn off the TV and do like your parents told you to when you were a kid and go outside!

Welcome to the Kanawha-Charleston Health Department
Division of Epidemiology
Information for Providers
  FAQs
 
I've seen several patients recently with a similar illness that I think may be related, should I report it to someone?
 
Yes, any disease outbreak, regardless of the disease, is reportable to your local health department. Even if you're unsure if it is an outbreak, if you've been seeing an increase in a particular illness above what you typically see, you must report it. KCHD will open an investigation and, with your help, will determine if it is an outbreak. 
 
I saw a patient who had an infectious disease, do I need to report it to the health department?
 
It depends. Even a single case of many communicable diseases are reportable to your local health department. Click here for a printable document that lists all of the reportable diseases and conditions and their reporting timeframes.



Events: Decreased vaccination rates among children has increased cases of measles in the US to levels that haven't been seen in years.  Click the following link for more information - Measles Health Alert. 

Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia Coli Infections: What Clinicians Need to Know


Clinician Guidelines for management of infectious diarrhea

CME presentation for physicians

Additional information cam be found at: http://www.cdc.gov/ecoli/